The Institute for Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Management (I-DIEM), a nonprofit focused on addressing equity […]
The Institute for Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Management (I-DIEM) recently participated in the recent Native […]
WASHINGTON — FEMA Administrator Deanne Criswell traveled to southern California and participated in two events on Friday, […]
ATLANTA – August 2, 2022 – The Institute for Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Management (I-DIEM) […]
The Leflore County Board of Supervisors learned valuable EMERGENCY management skills in a tabletop exercise Tuesday […]
On July 20, 2022, the Institute for Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Management (I-DIEM) was invited […]
The Environmental and Energy Study Institute (EESI) hosted a briefing on how the federal government as […]
This article was originally published on Politicopro.com He grew up in the segregated South attending elementary […]
African Americans and people in lower socioeconomic groups are being disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, […]
Ida made landfall in Louisiana as a Category 4 storm on Sunday. Reports of damage are […]
Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) in the United States are disproportionately affected by disasters. […]
When people discuss research in the context of corporate Diversity & Inclusion (D&I), the vast majority […]
Injustices like racism and white supremacy extensively manifest in emergency management and disaster preparedness. As the […]
A House Homeland Security subcommittee examined the coronavirus response and the impact of the virus on […]
The Southeast and Caribbean is a diverse region of people at different levels of readiness for […]
On Friday, May 28, 2022, Senators Schatz and Cassidy reintroduced the Disaster Learning and Lifesaving Act […]
After attending a racial equity training session hosted by NLC in 2019, Stevie Freeman-Montes, Sustainability Manager […]
The country’s top environmental official, EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan, joined a panel of health center […]
FEMA is making changes to a policy that has disproportionately affected Black homeowners in the South […]
Internal FEMA documents suggest low-income disaster survivors are less likely to receive some types of housing […]
The people who need help the most after disasters are least able to get it from […]
Institute for Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Management (I-DIEM) Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Chauncia Willis, discusses […]
On Thursday, October 21, 2021, at 12 pm Eastern Time, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights […]
How can emergency management (EM) change? Include different kinds of staff? Better serve diverse communities? Join […]
Wildfires. Flooding. Hurricanes. These all come to mind when one thinks of natural disasters. There have […]
The enemy of equity is the failure to acknowledge existing inequities. Now more than ever, it […]
Lisa Joyslin of the Minnesota Association of Volunteer Administrators (MAVA) and Chauncia Willis of the Institute […]
The “Emergency Management as a Career” panel series introduces students, professionals and those interested in or […]
Lt. General Julius Becton Student Scholarship Fund Winners Tidal Basin and the Institute for Diversity and […]
Guide to Expanding Mitigation: Making the Connection to Equity, FEMA This Guide to Expanding Mitigation is […]
The Institute for Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Management (I-DIEM) Resilient Opportunity Zones (ROZs) program is […]
Building Alliances for Equitable Resilience, FEMA The Institute for Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Management (I-DIEM) […]
Emergency Preparedness Amidst COVID-19: A Guide for Local Governments As local governments grapple with the COVID-19 […]
Conversation with Communities: Considerations for Equitable Flooding and Disaster Recovery Policy The Institute for Diversity and […]
Dual Disaster Handbook: 6 Recommendations for Local Leaders Responding to Floods During COVID-19 Floods are the […]
I-DIEM’s Chauncia Willis responds to Texas’ winter storm – USA Today As millions of Texans grapple […]
The impacts of Covid-19 have devastated the African-American community. In this report, I-DIEM provides a snapshot of the novel coronavirus disease as it pertains to the African American community with an emphasis on root causes of inequity and disparity.
Statement from the Institute for Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Management (I-DIEM) on President-Elect Joseph R. […]
The impacts of Covid-19 have devastated the African-American community. In this report, I-DIEM provides a snapshot of the novel coronavirus disease as it pertains to the African American community with an emphasis on root causes of inequity and disparity.
‘Embed Equity’ in Disaster Response, Experts Say “We’re in the midst of multiple disasters,” said Junia […]
An overwhelming number of emergency managers in the U.S. are white, and the profession must diversify to reverse decades of disaster response policies that have shunned minority communities and perpetuated racial discrimination, a state emergency manager told Congress yesterday.
The disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on communities of color requires the urgent integration of equity into emergency management. Disasters amplify existing inequities on a larger and more visible scale. Like a mirror reflecting our imperfections, disasters show us who we really are as people. Disasters present of vivid picture of those who we prioritize and how our most vulnerable are treated. This disaster has once again brought to light the glaring disparities that continue to entrap far too many communities of color in a continuous cycle of tragedy and loss. Institutional racism serves as the fuel that creates the inequities that combust when disasters strike. Discriminatory economic and social policies are the root cause for the vulnerability faced by marginalized communities. Decades of divestments have created impoverished communities across the country that lack basic necessities including affordable, safe, and adequate housing. Federal and State guidance to “socially distance” to limit the spread of COVID-19 is difficult when systemic racism has confined impoverished families to occupy incredibly small living spaces. Environmental injustices have located toxic facilities in and around communities of color contributing to concentration of black and brown people with the same “underlining conditions” (asthma, cancer, etc) that makes COVID-19 so fatal.