The Environmental and Energy Study Institute (EESI) hosted a briefing on how the federal government as well as states and cities around the country can better incorporate equity into emergency management. Climate change is driving more frequent and severe impacts such as polar vortices, sea level rise, wildfires, and extreme heat, which were covered in EESI’s Living with Climate Change briefing series. When disaster strikes, underserved communities are often hit hardest and longest. Ensuring that equity is incorporated into all aspects of emergency management—from preparedness to response to recovery—creates more resilient communities that are better able to live with climate change.

In this briefing, Chauncia Willis and Chief Shirell-Parfait Dardar, Traditional Tribal Chief of the Grand Caillou / Duluc Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw in Louisiana, discussed new approaches to emergency management that include community investment, interrupting systems of inequity, and the value of community partnerships between non-profits and communities to create sustainable, resilient futures.

More information can be found at: https://www.eesi.org/071422climatechange

Table of Contents:

00:00 – Start
03:51 – Chauncia Willis, Co-Founder and CEO, Institute for Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Management
18:05 – Chief Shirell Parfait-Dardar, Traditional Tribal Chief of the Grand Caillou/Dulac Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw in Louisiana
36:19 – Q&A

Topics and Speakers:

Chauncia Willis
Co-Founder and CEO, Institute for Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Management
Download Slides: https://www.eesi.org/files/Chauncia_W…
Skip to presentation: https://youtu.be/bM_TlpMapGU?t=03m51s

Chief Shirell Parfait-Dardar
Traditional Tribal Chief of the Grand Caillou/Dulac Band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw in Louisiana
Download Slides: https://www.eesi.org/files/Chief_Shir…
Skip to presentation: https://youtu.be/bM_TlpMapGU?t=18m05s

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