Message from the CEO

Message from the CEO

Mission

The mission of the Institute for Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Management (I- DIEM) is to serve as a resource and an advocate for the value of diversity and inclusion in emergency management (EM). I-DIEM leads efforts to increase the representation of women and people of color in the field of emergency management, including in positions of leadership, through awareness and education. I-DIEM serves as the conduit for research on diversity and inclusion, social equity and the practical application of equitable EM practices to improve outcomes and build resilience.

By respecting, appreciating and leveraging the value of women, communities of color and other under-represented groups, the emergency management enterprise will build the capacity needed to address the growing threat of climate change and extreme weather. I-DIEM supports the development and implementation of innovative community-based, mitigation and adaptation projects to enhance resilience in diverse, vulnerable, and under-served communities.

Vision

Diversity + Inclusion = Resilience

The vision of I-DIEM is to enhance global resilience and improve emergency management outcomes by respecting and leveraging diversity, inclusion, and equity.

Goals

  • Promote, support, and disseminate research regarding Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Management.
  1. Increase the number of women and people of color within the emergency management profession.
  • Educate and train the emergency management enterprise on diversity, inclusion and equity issues as it relates to women, people of color, people with disabilities, LGBTQ, various religious beliefs, low-income, disadvantaged communities, and other underrepresented groups within each phase of emergency management.
 
  • Highlight innovative Diversity and Inclusion best practices enhancing community resilience.

 

Hurricane Maria made its first landfall on the Caribbean island

Hurricane Maria made its first landfall on the Caribbean island

Hurricane Maria made its first landfall on the Caribbean island nation of Dominica on Monday, September 18, as a Category 5 storm with winds topping 160 mph – the strongest hurricane on record to make landfall there. Days later, the storm devastated the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico.
Maria is the first Category 4 hurricane to directly impact Puerto Rico in 85 years
Nearly the entire population of Puerto Rico — more than 3 million American citizens — are without electricity in Puerto Rico, nearly a week after Maria made landfall on Wednesday, September 20
It could take four to six months until power is restored, officials there say
Puerto Rico had not yet fully recovered from Hurricane Irma, which pummelled the island with high winds just two weeks earlier

One Year After After Deadly Hurricane Maria: ‘Puerto Rico Will Never Stop Crying’

One Year After After Deadly Hurricane Maria: ‘Puerto Rico Will Never Stop Crying’

New forms of governance, across borders

The focus of this stream is the analysis of a wide range of strategies for ‘renewal’, developed in a European context, as part of a wider change of welfare policy. The stream examines strategies for development, inclusion and diversity, from the post-national to the national, regional and local level, initiated in a variety of policy areas, such as education, regional and urban development, entrepreneurship and the inclusion of migrants and refugees in the labour market. Of particular importance is the development of networked and deliberative forms of governance based on partnerships between actors across sector divisions, including public sector institutions, business, trade unions, employer agencies, NGOs and civil society.

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